CERN, interested in GH 3D printed copper

CERN, interested in GH 3D printed copper

29/07/2019

FOR 3D PRINTED COPPER COMPONENTS

CERN in Switzerland is interested in GH Induction for 3D printed copper (Cu) components to be used in superconducting applications. The high purity of the Cu material and GH Induction’s EBM (Electron Beam Melting) additive manufacturing used in GH 3D INDUCTORS enables excellent material properties and complex geometries without traditional design restraints.

3DPCOIL - BALL OUTER RACE

3DPCOIL – BALL OUTER RACE

The European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) is one of the world’s largest and most respected centers. It is the home of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a powerful particle accelerator consisting of a 27 km long ring of more than 1000 superconducting magnets operated at -271.25 degrees Celsius (1.9 K). The magnets bend and shape two particle beams while accelerating structures boost their energy to reach center of mass energies of 13 TeV in controlled beam collisions in four physics experiments located around the ring.

CERN is exploring 3D printed Cu for next generation currents leads. The reason is to transport high electrical currents from room temperatures to the cryogenic operating temperatures of the superconducting magnets. The extraordinary Residual Resistance Ratio (RRR) of GH Induction’s EBM additive Cu manufacturing process and the freedom of design of 3D printing are key enablers. Then they enable significant size and weight reductions as well as possible efficiency improvements.

At present, industry uses inductors in the machines to harden metal parts by induction heating technology. Induction applications require a 100% material density and a high electrical conductivity. GH has been the first induction manufacturer deploying 3D printed inductors made of pure copper.  Their benefits in the automotive, tools and other industrial segments are huge. The increase of service life impacts reducing operating costs and allowing applications which are impossible with the traditional manufacturing methods.

Sources: www.cern.ch

For more information: www.3dinductors.com

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